Peter Green’s Order for Millstone September 13, 1830

Peter Green’s Order for Millstone September 13, 1830

Received of John Logan four Dollars & fifty Cents in ful payment for one Millstone formerly the property of my father Peter Green Deceast which is now on the plantation of Joshua Taylor Deceast

Sept 13th 1830

W.H. Green

attest William T. Green

The early 1830s is about the time that John Logan and others in Rutherford County were catching gold fever. I would be willing to bet that this millstone was going to be used for the purpose of mining. Thanks to a court case involving the heirs of John Logan vs a Green (might have been one of these Green’s but unfortunately the suit never uses his first name) we know that John purchased a 30 year lease from Thomas Coggins on July 11, 1831 along with Thomas Dews and John McEntire for the “special and sole purpose of digging and searching for and extracting the precious metals; if any be there found , on or from any and every part of the said premises”. Logan purchased his interest in the minerals with a barrel of flour and 75 gallons of whiskey. After the mines had been found not to be worth working, Logan rescinded the contract with Coggins and took Coggins’ bond for the value of the flour and whiskey, and later received the money.  John’s sons George W. Logan and John W. Logan brought suit against Green, McDowell and Lord in 1846 when they learned that they took four or five “pennyweights” of gold from the property which they thought their father still had a lease on. The Logan brothers ended up losing the case and had to pay the court costs. (source: The Mining Reports)

According to an article in The Spectator on June 18, 1831 a large number of new mines were discovered on Richardson’s and Floyd’s Creeks. Peter Green, who lived on Richardson’s creek was offered $35,000 for his mines that week but he refused (source: Griffin). Maybe this article is referencing a younger Peter as the one in this receipt is deceased.

Joshua Taylor appeared to own a pretty impressive plantation. There is a website with a little bit of info on the plantation found here.

Please leave a comment below if you have additional information about Peter Green, Joshua Taylor, William T. Green and W.H. Green that you would like to share.

About the Logan Project: I possess a box of 170 documents passed down 6 generations in the Logan family that originate from John Logan (1775-1841) of Rutherford County, NC. These documents are mainly receipts that show the various business and legal dealings of many different families from Rutherford County, NC. I will be posting these documents on this blog in chronological order. The scanned images of these documents are the copyright of Jonathan Medford. Do not redistribute these documents for the purpose of commercial gain without his expressed written permission. If you would like to start reading them from the first document, you can start here.

Previous Post: J.W. Cabaniss Receipt June 12, 1830

J.W. Cabaniss Receipt June 12, 1830

J.W. Cabaniss Receipt June 12, 1830

Rec,d of John Logan Esqr thirty eight, 31/ in full payments for Schooling June 12, 1830

J.W. Cabaniss

J.W. Cabiness is the brother of John Logan‘s eventual daughter-in-law Mary Elizabeth Cabiness who marries John’s son George W. Logan.

Below is a wonderful account of Dr. James W. Cabaniss which was originally written by attorney John Plath Green in Dallas, TX in 1956 but was transcribed and distributed electronically with permission of the author’s wife by Joe Cabaniss in 1998. The book was called Henry Cabaniss & His Descendants.

Born about 1804 in Charlottee County, Virginia; son of George Cabaniss and Jenny Elliott; married 26 November 1833 by the Rev.Drury Dobbins in Shelby, North Carolina, to his cousin, Elizabeth Donohue Elliott, daughter of John Crenshaw Elliott; was a practicing medical physician; children: twin sons died at birth; daughter  died shortly after birth; son died at birth; Louisa Yandel Cabaniss; infant died at birth; Eliza Bradforth Cabaniss; Mary Slade Cabaniss; Western Carolina Cabaniss; Corrinnah Elizabeth Cabaniss; James William Cabaniss; resided during last 25 years of his life on the main road leading from Rutherfordton to Lincolnton, at Piedmont, North Carolina; died in Cleveland County, North Carolina, 28 September1862. The following newspaper item was published at his death:

“Dr. James William Cabaniss died at his residence in Cleveland County, N.C., on the 28th day of September, 1862, in the 52ndyear of his age. The deceased was for more than twenty yearsthe child of affliction and for several years previous to his death confined pretty much to his room and bed, reduced almost to a skeleton by that terrible disease, Dyspepsia; all ofwhich he bore with Christian fortitude and resignation, seldom if ever heard to mourn, but waiting God’s own appointed time. The Doctor was a true and faithful member of the M.E.Church for about 15 years before his death, giving a full assurance of his dying testimony, the religion he professed was able to carry him through the valley and shadow of death and fear no evil. The day before his death I called to see him for the last time—my old and much esteemed friend, with whom it had been my pleasure to be intimately acquainted for more than thirty years. I found him completely emaciated and worn out, scarcely able to speak, but retaining all the vigor of his intellect. He spoke of his final end with the utmost confidence in God, waiting for his appointed time. When I bade him good-by, he took me by the hand and with a firmgrasp said, ‘Farewell, my old friend. God bless you; may we meet in Heaven.’ Thus has passed away from us a most excellent and good man leaving to mourn loss an affectionate and pious wife and four interesting daughters, with a large circle of relations. May the affliction be sanctified to their good.”

Please leave a comment below if you have additional information about J.W. Cabaniss. that you would like to share.

About the Logan Project: I possess a box of 170 documents passed down 6 generations in the Logan family that originate from John Logan (1775-1841) of Rutherford County, NC. These documents are mainly receipts that show the various business and legal dealings of many different families from Rutherford County, NC. I will be posting these documents on this blog in chronological order. The scanned images of these documents are the copyright of Jonathan Medford. Do not redistribute these documents for the purpose of commercial gain without his expressed written permission. If you would like to start reading them from the first document, you can start here.

Previous Post: William Barnett Receipt January 8, 1830
Next Post: Peter Green’s Order for Millstone September 13, 1830

William Barnett Receipt January 8, 1830

William Barnett Receipt January 8, 1830

$15.00
One day after I promise to pay Jn Logan Fifteen Dollars for value recd witness my hand and seal Jan 8th 1830

William Barnett (X his mark) [seal]

witness W.T. Barnett
Alright so I haven’t been able to find much information on the Barnetts of Rutherford County, NC. Some sources online show a large Barnett family that moved to Rutherford County from Virginia but then most of them left as early pioneers of Kentucky. I do see a William Barnett in the 1810 and 1820 census in Rutherford County. In 1830 William Barnett is in Buncombe County, NC.

Please leave a comment below if you have additional information about William Barnett and W. T. Barnett that you would like to share.

About the Logan Project: I possess a box of 170 documents passed down 6 generations in the Logan family that originate from John Logan (1775-1841) of Rutherford County, NC. These documents are mainly receipts that show the various business and legal dealings of many different families from Rutherford County, NC. I will be posting these documents on this blog in chronological order. The scanned images of these documents are the copyright of Jonathan Medford. Do not redistribute these documents for the purpose of commercial gain without his expressed written permission. If you would like to start reading them from the first document, you can start here.

Previous Post: B.H. Carson receipt to J. Logan September 14, 1829
Next Post:
J.W. Cabaniss Receipt June 12, 1830

B.H. Carson receipt to J. Logan September 14, 1829

B.H. Carson receipt to J. Logan September 14, 1829

John Logan Sr. taxes for 1828 on $4,000
Value of land at 21 Cents $100 Value
Do $2,000 Value of town lots at $8.40
26 cents for $100 Value is —– $5.20
Do on of 7 horses at 75 ct Each is — $5.25
Recd of John Logan the Sum $18.85
of Eighteen Dollars & 85 Cents in full of the
above stated taxes this 14th, of Sept 1829

Wm Carson Shff

It is interesting that the taxes for the previous year seem to always be paid around September. John Logan’s value of land increased by 25% from 1825. His town lots improved by 100% and he has 3 fewer horses than he did in 1825.

I wrote about Sheriff William Carson in the blog post in the 1823 Tax Receipt blog post. I always mention that these receipts are usually labeled on the back. This one is clearly marked “B. H. Carson Tax Receipt for John Logan’s 1828 taxes”.  I am not sure if William Carson’s middle initial is known or not but it is definitely written here as an H.

That’s about all I have on this one.

Please leave a comment below if you have additional information about William Carson that you would like to share.

About the Logan Project: I possess a box of 170 documents passed down 6 generations in the Logan family that originate from John Logan (1775-1841) of Rutherford County, NC. These documents are mainly receipts that show the various business and legal dealings of many different families from Rutherford County, NC. I will be posting these documents on this blog in chronological order. The scanned images of these documents are the copyright of Jonathan Medford. Do not redistribute these documents for the purpose of commercial gain without his expressed written permission. If you would like to start reading them from the first document, you can start here.

Previous Post: Miller Receipt December 6, 1827

Miller Receipt December 6, 1827

Miller Receipt December 6, 1827

Received Charleston Dec 6 1827 from Mr. McEntire Fifty Dollars on a/c of John Logan

Miller Ripley & Co.

P Jn Weller

First off, Them Medfords Blog had over 100 page views yesterday! Pretty cool! I started working on this receipt yesterday and I could not find any information on Ripleys and Wellers in Rutherford County, NC. I also had a hard time deciphering the second word in this document. I started thinking about who this Mr. McEntire could be and so I did a search on my blog and came across the profile I did on Dr. John McEntire. Then it hit me that Dr. McEntire studied in Charleston, SC and that second word looked an awful lot like Charleston. That’s why the Ripley and Weller names were elusive to me.

This would suggest to me that Dr. McEntire was in Charleston, SC for a period of time around 1827. Being owed a considerable sum from Mr. McEntire, John Logan likely would have hired an attorney or other agent in SC to collect this from him.

Almost all of these receipts are labeled on the back and I try to use this same label in the title. That’s why I call this the Miller Receipt. I thought he named this after one of the possible attorneys “Miller Ripley”. After all, there appears to be some kind of title at the end of his name.

It turns out that Miller Ripley isn’t a person after all. It is the Miller, Ripley & Co. which is a dry goods merchant with operations in Charleston and New York. This company was owned by Horatio Miller, Samuel P. Ripley, George N. Miller and Henry C. Bissell). They bought a site on 290-292 King St. in 1833-34 and had a double building erected by John Gordon in 1834. lt was destroyed in the great fire of 1838. The double building was immediately rebuilt, reusing the common wall from the burned structure. The two halves were subsequently remodeled from their original Greek Revival appearance. (source: Charles County Public Library)

So here I was thinking that Dr. McEntire was skipping town without settling his debts with John Logan, and here he is on a trip to Charleston and buying some dry goods on John Logans behalf! You really have to think these things through!

I assume what appears to be P. Jn. Weller is an employee of Miller, Ripley & Company. I haven’t been able to find any information on him. Weller is not a popular name in South Carolina but it is in New York. Perhaps he is an employee with a connection with their New York office.

Please leave a comment below if you have any additional info on Miller, Ripley & Co., P. Jn. Weller or Dr. McEntire.

About the Logan Project: I possess a box of 170 documents passed down 6 generations in the Logan family that originate from John Logan (1775-1841) of Rutherford County, NC. These documents are mainly receipts that show the various business and legal dealings of many different families from Rutherford County, NC. I will be posting these documents on this blog in chronological order. The scanned images of these documents are the copyright of Jonathan Medford. Do not redistribute these documents for the purpose of commercial gain without his expressed written permission.

Previous Post: John Logan Sr. 1825 Taxes September 11, 1826
Next Post:
B.H. Carson receipt to J. Logan September 14, 1829

John Logan Sr. 1825 Taxes September 11, 1826

John Logan Sr. 1825 Taxes September 11, 1826

John Logan Sr. Taxes for 1825 on $3000
Value of land at 19 cents per $100 value is
——————————————— $5.70
$1000 value of town [?] at 21 cents is   2.10
and 1 white [mare?] is ———————–      62 ½
and 9 Black do. at 70 ½  is ————      6.34 ½

$14.77

Recd of John Logan the sum of fourteen dollars & 77 cents in full of the above taxes 11th of Sept 1826

William Carson Shff

This is the first tax receipt in the collection that gives a lot of detail as far as tax rates and what John Logan was taxed for. This is also the first instance where he is referred to as John Logan Sr. There are a couple of words that I can’t make out in this document. I wonder what the word is after “town”. I believe the word after “white” is “mare” or “horse”. I know that a horse tax was not uncommon in the 1800s. Any time you see “do” it means “ditto”.

I’ve seen little heats cut into a few of these documents. I wonder what that is all about?

I previously wrote about William Carson in John Logan 1823 Tax Receipt.

Please leave a comment below if you can help me identify some of the mystery words in this document.

About the Logan Project: I possess a box of 170 documents passed down 6 generations in the Logan family that originate from John Logan (1775-1841) of Rutherford County, NC. These documents are mainly receipts that show the various business and legal dealings of many different families from Rutherford County, NC. I will be posting these documents on this blog in chronological order. The scanned images of these documents are the copyright of Jonathan Medford. Do not redistribute these documents for the purpose of commercial gain without his expressed written permission.

Previous Post: Bradley Dalton Receipt for work on the Jail February 6, 1826
Next Post:
Miller Receipt December 6, 1827

Bradley Dalton Receipt for work on the Jail February 6, 1826

Bradley Dalton Receipt for work on the Jail February 6, 1826

February the 6th 1826 Recved of John Logan five Dollars for work on the Jail window frame & door frame

Bradley Dalton (X his mark)

B.F. Logan

This is the kind of receipt I enjoy coming across. I hope I can find a Bradley Dalton descendant out there that appreciates learning about the kind of work that their ancestor did.

The Dalton line isn’t an easy one to research in a morning’s worth of blogging. At first glance it appears that there were some Dalton brothers that settled in Rutherford County from VA before the 1800s. Soon after, many went west. One of the brothers was a Bradley Dalton but the there was a younger Bradley Dalton who was a son of William Dalton. Which Bradley is the one referenced in this document would be best left to a Dalton expert to decide. I am reaching out to a lot of Dalton researchers who will hopefully be kind of enough to leave a comment for the benefit of all who read this blog.

Many of you know that my wife is a descendant of John Logan through his son Judge George W. Logan who was made famous by his successful prosecutions against the KKK. George’s son R. W. Logan and J.B. Carpenter owned a Republican slanted newspaper called the Rutherford Star. This paper was raided by the KKK as well as the homes of many Republican voters. The most famous was the lynching of Aaron Biggerstaff which sparked a U.S. Congressional investigation into the matter. J.B. Carpenter testified to congress that B. F. Logan, Sheriff of Cleveland County was involved in the raids and that his horse had been identified as being in the raids and that Mr. Biggerstaff offered to swear that he was one of the men at his house. Congressman Blair asked if he is related to Judge Logan and J.B. Carpenter answered, “Very distantly related”. (source: Congressional Testimony)

When I see the many business dealings between B. F. Logan and John and his son John W. Logan (whose house in Mooresboro was also raided by the Klan) I often think about how B.F. Logan would later turn against his own family in such a violent way. Then again Aaron Biggerstaff and his brother Samuel were staunch enemies of each other according to the congressional testimony. If B.F. Logan is distantly related to George W. then he must be a descendant of one of Maj. Francis Logan‘s brothers.

I’ve never been able to find much information about B. F. Logan. According to Civil War roster lists, his name is Benjamin F. Logan. I am hoping to learn more about his Logan line.

Please leave a comment below if you have additional information about Bradley Dalton or Benjamin F. Logan.

About the Logan Project: I possess a box of 170 documents passed down 6 generations in the Logan family that originate from John Logan (1775-1841) of Rutherford County, NC. These documents are mainly receipts that show the various business and legal dealings of many different families from Rutherford County, NC. I will be posting these documents on this blog in chronological order. The scanned images of these documents are the copyright of Jonathan Medford. Do not redistribute these documents for the purpose of commercial gain without his expressed written permission.

Previous Post: David Hill Receipt January 17, 1824
Next Post:
John Logan Sr. 1825 Taxes September 11, 1826

David Hill receipt dated January 17, 1824

David Hill receipt dated January 17, 1824

Recd of John Logan Esqr one of the wardens of the poor for the county of Rutherford one hundred & fifty dollars for part payment for keeping its poor of said county for the year 1824 January the 17th 1824

David Hill

J.W. Carson

I think that this receipt offers us a true glimpse into how different society was in the 1820s. This is before the days of federal income taxes and obviously before the era of Social Security. The responsibility of taking care of the poor  in North Carolina was placed on Wardens of the Poor from 1777 until 1917 (source).

Until 1868, each county had seven Wardens of the Poor who were elected until 1846. After that they were appointed by the County Courts. Their main duties were to receive and disburse money for poor relief, determine what persons were entitled to public assistance, and supervise the operation of institutions for the poor (source).

According to this information, John Logan was elected to be one of Rutherford County’s seven Wardens of the Poor. This $150 likely didn’t come from his personal wealth, but he was probably responsible for collecting money from other citizens for this purpose. Perhaps David Hill and J.W. Carson were two of the other Wardens of the Poor that might have had the responsibility of disbursing the monies or supervising the operation of Poor Houses or Poor Farms.

David Hill was born May 1, 1795 in Rutherford County, North Carolina. He was the son of Reubin Hill (1764 -1858) and Margaret McBrayer (1775-1834). He married to Amelia Lucinda Potts (1822-1880). A large portion of the Hill family moved to Dawson County, GA including David’s father and many of his siblings. David died in Dawson County, GA on June 10, 1885. (source Sarah Catherine Liles)

James W. Carson is the nephew of the Sheriff William Carson from a previous blog post. James was also Sheriff of Rutherford County from October 1838 to October 1842.  James was born December 23, 1789 in Rutherford Co., NC. He was the son of General John G. Carson and Mary Withrow. He married Catherine Canselor (1791-1867)in Rutherford Co., NC on February 15, 1814. James died October 24, 1846. (source Lela Whisnant)

Please leave a comment below if you have additional information about Wardens of the Poor (particularly in Rutherford Co., NC), David Hill or James W. Carson.

About the Logan Project: I possess a box of 170 documents passed down 6 generations in the Logan family that originate from John Logan (1775-1841) of Rutherford County, NC. These documents are mainly receipts that show the various business and legal dealings of many different families from Rutherford County, NC. I will be posting these documents on this blog in chronological order. The scanned images of these documents are the copyright of Jonathan Medford. Do not redistribute these documents for the purpose of commercial gain without his expressed written permission.

Previous Post: Fred A. Brown Receipt for “Schooling” November 24, 1823
Next Post:
Bradley Dalton Receipt for work on the Jail February 6, 1826

Fred A. Brown receipt for "schooling" dated November 24, 1823

Fred A. Brown receipt for "schooling" dated November 24, 1823

$5.00 Rutherford Nov. 24th 1823 Recd John Logan Esq. Five Dollars, the amount of his subscription and schooling in full.

Fred A. Brown

I haven’t blogged in the past several days because I was out of town on business, but also because I spent some time trying to learn more about Fred A. Brown and I could find nothing on him. It frustrates the heck out of me, but the is the very reason why I think it is best to blog about these documents instead of trying to peddle them in a book like so many others would. Hopefully someone out there can shed a little light on Mr. Brown.

I assume that Fred might be a schoolmaster. I was hoping that I could at least learn more about the schools in Rutherford County, NC around the 1820s but I didn’t have much luck with that either. I live in a town in eastern North Carolina called Whiteville and the oldest structure in the town is the Reuben Brown House. Coincidentally enough, Reuben Brown was schoolmaster for the Whiteville Academy subscription from 1869-1870. While I was searching for a schoolmaster named Fred Brown online, it pulled up information about the Reuben Brown house.

If I hadn’t seen the term “Whiteville Academy subscription” I might have also pegged Fred as a newspaper man as well as I certainly wanted to learn more about what “subscription” meant in this document. A subscription school was one that was supported by wealthy families who paid a “subscription”.

A couple of John Logan’s children would have been school-age when this receipt was written. Lawson was 11, George was 8 and John might have been too young at 4. I guess one might assume that the subscription was $2.50 per child and I’m not sure if this would have been on a monthly or yearly (seasonal) basis.

Please leave a comment below if you have additional information about Fred A. Brown or subscription schools (particularly in Rutherford County) that you would like to share.

About the Logan Project: I possess a box of 170 documents passed down 6 generations in the Logan family that originate from John Logan (1775-1841) of Rutherford County, NC. These documents are mainly receipts that show the various business and legal dealings of many different families from Rutherford County, NC. I will be posting these documents on this blog in chronological order. The scanned images of these documents are the copyright of Jonathan Medford. Do not redistribute these documents for the purpose of commercial gain without his expressed written permission.

Previous Post: John Logan 1823 Tax Receipt

Next Post: David Hill Receipt January 17, 1824

John Logan 1823 Tax Receipt

John Logan 1823 Tax Receipt

Recd of John Logan his tax in full for 1823 $18.78

By William Carson Shff

Here is a short and sweet little receipt. His estate is certainly growing, that or taxes are getting higher. In 1813 he paid £114. In 1818 he paid $9.51.

William  Carson was Sheriff of Rutherford County, NC from 1798 to 1809 and again from 1821 to 1836. He also served as a state senator in 1810. He was born about 1773 in Pennsylvania, a son of Dan Carson. His mother was a McFarland. The family emigrated to Rutherford County about 1790, and settled near Hollis. William had two brothers and four sisters. He was brother to General John C. Carson.  [source: History of old Tryon and Rutherford Counties, North Carolina, 1730-1936 By Clarence W. Griffin]

William Carson married Dorcas Hughey and received a large sum of slaves through that marriage. They settled on a farm near Duncan’s Creek Presbyterian Church near Hollis. Dorcas was the daughter of James Hughey and grand-daughter of John Withrow and niece of Capt. James Withrow. William’s daughters married Rev. Louis McCurry, John K. Wells, John Lattimore and Sam McFarland. They all raised families. [Source: Forest City [N.C.] THIS WEEK newspaper’s series, “Bridges to the Past,” a genealogical column by Mrs. Ernest Newton and Roy Brooks which has been published as a bound volume. This article appeared in Vol. II, pp. 159-160 (March 10, 1976)]

William is buried at the old Price family cemetery, near Hollis. The inscription on his monument shows that he died January 16, 1845, at 72 years old. His wife died October 12, 1851, at 75 years old. He was an extensive landowner and was a member of the Presbyterian Church. [source: History of old Tryon and Rutherford Counties, North Carolina, 1730-1936 By Clarence W. Griffin]

Please leave a comment below if you have additional information about William Carson that you would like to share.

About the Logan Project: I possess a box of 170 documents passed down 6 generations in the Logan family that originate from John Logan (1775-1841) of Rutherford County, NC. These documents are mainly receipts that show the various business and legal dealings of many different families from Rutherford County, NC. I will be posting these documents on this blog in chronological order. The scanned images of these documents are the copyright of Jonathan Medford. Do not redistribute these documents for the purpose of commercial gain without his expressed written permission.

Previous Post: Robert McAfee Receipt for putting steps to the Court House December 14, 1822
Next Post:
Fred A. Brown Receipt for “Schooling” November 24, 1823

Jonathan Medford

Jonathan Medford is an experienced genealogist who specializes in researching North Carolina records. Contact him at jon@medfordgenetics.com.

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