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Peter Green’s Order for Millstone September 13, 1830

Peter Green’s Order for Millstone September 13, 1830

Received of John Logan four Dollars & fifty Cents in ful payment for one Millstone formerly the property of my father Peter Green Deceast which is now on the plantation of Joshua Taylor Deceast

Sept 13th 1830

W.H. Green

attest William T. Green

The early 1830s is about the time that John Logan and others in Rutherford County were catching gold fever. I would be willing to bet that this millstone was going to be used for the purpose of mining. Thanks to a court case involving the heirs of John Logan vs a Green (might have been one of these Green’s but unfortunately the suit never uses his first name) we know that John purchased a 30 year lease from Thomas Coggins on July 11, 1831 along with Thomas Dews and John McEntire for the “special and sole purpose of digging and searching for and extracting the precious metals; if any be there found , on or from any and every part of the said premises”. Logan purchased his interest in the minerals with a barrel of flour and 75 gallons of whiskey. After the mines had been found not to be worth working, Logan rescinded the contract with Coggins and took Coggins’ bond for the value of the flour and whiskey, and later received the money.  John’s sons George W. Logan and John W. Logan brought suit against Green, McDowell and Lord in 1846 when they learned that they took four or five “pennyweights” of gold from the property which they thought their father still had a lease on. The Logan brothers ended up losing the case and had to pay the court costs. (source: The Mining Reports)

According to an article in The Spectator on June 18, 1831 a large number of new mines were discovered on Richardson’s and Floyd’s Creeks. Peter Green, who lived on Richardson’s creek was offered $35,000 for his mines that week but he refused (source: Griffin). Maybe this article is referencing a younger Peter as the one in this receipt is deceased.

Joshua Taylor appeared to own a pretty impressive plantation. There is a website with a little bit of info on the plantation found here.

Please leave a comment below if you have additional information about Peter Green, Joshua Taylor, William T. Green and W.H. Green that you would like to share.

About the Logan Project: I possess a box of 170 documents passed down 6 generations in the Logan family that originate from John Logan (1775-1841) of Rutherford County, NC. These documents are mainly receipts that show the various business and legal dealings of many different families from Rutherford County, NC. I will be posting these documents on this blog in chronological order. The scanned images of these documents are the copyright of Jonathan Medford. Do not redistribute these documents for the purpose of commercial gain without his expressed written permission. If you would like to start reading them from the first document, you can start here.

Previous Post: J.W. Cabaniss Receipt June 12, 1830

Miller Receipt December 6, 1827

Miller Receipt December 6, 1827

Received Charleston Dec 6 1827 from Mr. McEntire Fifty Dollars on a/c of John Logan

Miller Ripley & Co.

P Jn Weller

First off, Them Medfords Blog had over 100 page views yesterday! Pretty cool! I started working on this receipt yesterday and I could not find any information on Ripleys and Wellers in Rutherford County, NC. I also had a hard time deciphering the second word in this document. I started thinking about who this Mr. McEntire could be and so I did a search on my blog and came across the profile I did on Dr. John McEntire. Then it hit me that Dr. McEntire studied in Charleston, SC and that second word looked an awful lot like Charleston. That’s why the Ripley and Weller names were elusive to me.

This would suggest to me that Dr. McEntire was in Charleston, SC for a period of time around 1827. Being owed a considerable sum from Mr. McEntire, John Logan likely would have hired an attorney or other agent in SC to collect this from him.

Almost all of these receipts are labeled on the back and I try to use this same label in the title. That’s why I call this the Miller Receipt. I thought he named this after one of the possible attorneys “Miller Ripley”. After all, there appears to be some kind of title at the end of his name.

It turns out that Miller Ripley isn’t a person after all. It is the Miller, Ripley & Co. which is a dry goods merchant with operations in Charleston and New York. This company was owned by Horatio Miller, Samuel P. Ripley, George N. Miller and Henry C. Bissell). They bought a site on 290-292 King St. in 1833-34 and had a double building erected by John Gordon in 1834. lt was destroyed in the great fire of 1838. The double building was immediately rebuilt, reusing the common wall from the burned structure. The two halves were subsequently remodeled from their original Greek Revival appearance. (source: Charles County Public Library)

So here I was thinking that Dr. McEntire was skipping town without settling his debts with John Logan, and here he is on a trip to Charleston and buying some dry goods on John Logans behalf! You really have to think these things through!

I assume what appears to be P. Jn. Weller is an employee of Miller, Ripley & Company. I haven’t been able to find any information on him. Weller is not a popular name in South Carolina but it is in New York. Perhaps he is an employee with a connection with their New York office.

Please leave a comment below if you have any additional info on Miller, Ripley & Co., P. Jn. Weller or Dr. McEntire.

About the Logan Project: I possess a box of 170 documents passed down 6 generations in the Logan family that originate from John Logan (1775-1841) of Rutherford County, NC. These documents are mainly receipts that show the various business and legal dealings of many different families from Rutherford County, NC. I will be posting these documents on this blog in chronological order. The scanned images of these documents are the copyright of Jonathan Medford. Do not redistribute these documents for the purpose of commercial gain without his expressed written permission.

Previous Post: John Logan Sr. 1825 Taxes September 11, 1826
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B.H. Carson receipt to J. Logan September 14, 1829

David Hill receipt dated January 17, 1824

David Hill receipt dated January 17, 1824

Recd of John Logan Esqr one of the wardens of the poor for the county of Rutherford one hundred & fifty dollars for part payment for keeping its poor of said county for the year 1824 January the 17th 1824

David Hill

J.W. Carson

I think that this receipt offers us a true glimpse into how different society was in the 1820s. This is before the days of federal income taxes and obviously before the era of Social Security. The responsibility of taking care of the poor  in North Carolina was placed on Wardens of the Poor from 1777 until 1917 (source).

Until 1868, each county had seven Wardens of the Poor who were elected until 1846. After that they were appointed by the County Courts. Their main duties were to receive and disburse money for poor relief, determine what persons were entitled to public assistance, and supervise the operation of institutions for the poor (source).

According to this information, John Logan was elected to be one of Rutherford County’s seven Wardens of the Poor. This $150 likely didn’t come from his personal wealth, but he was probably responsible for collecting money from other citizens for this purpose. Perhaps David Hill and J.W. Carson were two of the other Wardens of the Poor that might have had the responsibility of disbursing the monies or supervising the operation of Poor Houses or Poor Farms.

David Hill was born May 1, 1795 in Rutherford County, North Carolina. He was the son of Reubin Hill (1764 -1858) and Margaret McBrayer (1775-1834). He married to Amelia Lucinda Potts (1822-1880). A large portion of the Hill family moved to Dawson County, GA including David’s father and many of his siblings. David died in Dawson County, GA on June 10, 1885. (source Sarah Catherine Liles)

James W. Carson is the nephew of the Sheriff William Carson from a previous blog post. James was also Sheriff of Rutherford County from October 1838 to October 1842.  James was born December 23, 1789 in Rutherford Co., NC. He was the son of General John G. Carson and Mary Withrow. He married Catherine Canselor (1791-1867)in Rutherford Co., NC on February 15, 1814. James died October 24, 1846. (source Lela Whisnant)

Please leave a comment below if you have additional information about Wardens of the Poor (particularly in Rutherford Co., NC), David Hill or James W. Carson.

About the Logan Project: I possess a box of 170 documents passed down 6 generations in the Logan family that originate from John Logan (1775-1841) of Rutherford County, NC. These documents are mainly receipts that show the various business and legal dealings of many different families from Rutherford County, NC. I will be posting these documents on this blog in chronological order. The scanned images of these documents are the copyright of Jonathan Medford. Do not redistribute these documents for the purpose of commercial gain without his expressed written permission.

Previous Post: Fred A. Brown Receipt for “Schooling” November 24, 1823
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Bradley Dalton Receipt for work on the Jail February 6, 1826

Fred A. Brown receipt for "schooling" dated November 24, 1823

Fred A. Brown receipt for "schooling" dated November 24, 1823

$5.00 Rutherford Nov. 24th 1823 Recd John Logan Esq. Five Dollars, the amount of his subscription and schooling in full.

Fred A. Brown

I haven’t blogged in the past several days because I was out of town on business, but also because I spent some time trying to learn more about Fred A. Brown and I could find nothing on him. It frustrates the heck out of me, but the is the very reason why I think it is best to blog about these documents instead of trying to peddle them in a book like so many others would. Hopefully someone out there can shed a little light on Mr. Brown.

I assume that Fred might be a schoolmaster. I was hoping that I could at least learn more about the schools in Rutherford County, NC around the 1820s but I didn’t have much luck with that either. I live in a town in eastern North Carolina called Whiteville and the oldest structure in the town is the Reuben Brown House. Coincidentally enough, Reuben Brown was schoolmaster for the Whiteville Academy subscription from 1869-1870. While I was searching for a schoolmaster named Fred Brown online, it pulled up information about the Reuben Brown house.

If I hadn’t seen the term “Whiteville Academy subscription” I might have also pegged Fred as a newspaper man as well as I certainly wanted to learn more about what “subscription” meant in this document. A subscription school was one that was supported by wealthy families who paid a “subscription”.

A couple of John Logan’s children would have been school-age when this receipt was written. Lawson was 11, George was 8 and John might have been too young at 4. I guess one might assume that the subscription was $2.50 per child and I’m not sure if this would have been on a monthly or yearly (seasonal) basis.

Please leave a comment below if you have additional information about Fred A. Brown or subscription schools (particularly in Rutherford County) that you would like to share.

About the Logan Project: I possess a box of 170 documents passed down 6 generations in the Logan family that originate from John Logan (1775-1841) of Rutherford County, NC. These documents are mainly receipts that show the various business and legal dealings of many different families from Rutherford County, NC. I will be posting these documents on this blog in chronological order. The scanned images of these documents are the copyright of Jonathan Medford. Do not redistribute these documents for the purpose of commercial gain without his expressed written permission.

Previous Post: John Logan 1823 Tax Receipt

Next Post: David Hill Receipt January 17, 1824

John Logan 1823 Tax Receipt

John Logan 1823 Tax Receipt

Recd of John Logan his tax in full for 1823 $18.78

By William Carson Shff

Here is a short and sweet little receipt. His estate is certainly growing, that or taxes are getting higher. In 1813 he paid £114. In 1818 he paid $9.51.

William  Carson was Sheriff of Rutherford County, NC from 1798 to 1809 and again from 1821 to 1836. He also served as a state senator in 1810. He was born about 1773 in Pennsylvania, a son of Dan Carson. His mother was a McFarland. The family emigrated to Rutherford County about 1790, and settled near Hollis. William had two brothers and four sisters. He was brother to General John C. Carson.  [source: History of old Tryon and Rutherford Counties, North Carolina, 1730-1936 By Clarence W. Griffin]

William Carson married Dorcas Hughey and received a large sum of slaves through that marriage. They settled on a farm near Duncan’s Creek Presbyterian Church near Hollis. Dorcas was the daughter of James Hughey and grand-daughter of John Withrow and niece of Capt. James Withrow. William’s daughters married Rev. Louis McCurry, John K. Wells, John Lattimore and Sam McFarland. They all raised families. [Source: Forest City [N.C.] THIS WEEK newspaper’s series, “Bridges to the Past,” a genealogical column by Mrs. Ernest Newton and Roy Brooks which has been published as a bound volume. This article appeared in Vol. II, pp. 159-160 (March 10, 1976)]

William is buried at the old Price family cemetery, near Hollis. The inscription on his monument shows that he died January 16, 1845, at 72 years old. His wife died October 12, 1851, at 75 years old. He was an extensive landowner and was a member of the Presbyterian Church. [source: History of old Tryon and Rutherford Counties, North Carolina, 1730-1936 By Clarence W. Griffin]

Please leave a comment below if you have additional information about William Carson that you would like to share.

About the Logan Project: I possess a box of 170 documents passed down 6 generations in the Logan family that originate from John Logan (1775-1841) of Rutherford County, NC. These documents are mainly receipts that show the various business and legal dealings of many different families from Rutherford County, NC. I will be posting these documents on this blog in chronological order. The scanned images of these documents are the copyright of Jonathan Medford. Do not redistribute these documents for the purpose of commercial gain without his expressed written permission.

Previous Post: Robert McAfee Receipt for putting steps to the Court House December 14, 1822
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Fred A. Brown Receipt for “Schooling” November 24, 1823

Robert McAfee receipt for putting steps to the court house.

Robert McAfee receipt for putting steps to the court house.

Received of John Logan County treasurer of Public Building One Dollar My charge for putting steps to lower end of Courthouse this 14th December 1822

Robt McAfee

This receipt is something that I hope gets a McAfee descendant excited. I think it is always neat to see the handwriting of your ancestor and to learn more about the kind of work that they did.

Robert McAfee was born May 30,  1777 and died May 5, 1848 in Gwinnett County, GA, having removed from Rutherford Co., NC.  He was married to Mary Miller(1784-1872), daughter of Colonel John Miller, son of David Miller, who gave the famous “Blessing” in Kings’s Mountain and It’s Heros, and Mary (Kerr) Miller. Mary Miller’s mother was Susannah Twitty, daughter to William Twitty who was killed by Indians while on an expedition with Daniel Boone, Henderson, and Felix Walker. Felix Walker was a witness at the marriage of John Miller and Susannah Twitty on May 15, 1783.

Robert and Mary (Miller) McAfee had eight children. When the older sons went to Georgia, Robert went to see them settled, and organized Mt. Carmel Methodist Church near Pickneyville, Gwinnett County. The children of Robert McAfee and Mary were: John Miller McAfee (the physician, legislator, military BG officer in reserves), James Taliaferro McAfee (the legislative senator of GA/AL), Susan Mira McAfee married Jackson Gregory, William Madison McAfee (GA), Tillman G. McAfee (not to be confused with the Tillman McAfee in Abner McAfee’s line), Lemuel Alston McAfee (went to Texas), Alfred Burton McAfee (In Rutherford/Lincoln counties, the Burton Family and McAfee family were close friends); went to Texas. [source]

Robert’s steps to the court house is not the only building project credited to Robert McAfee. Mrs. Imogene McAfee Buder’s genealogical work tells that he “gifted” Jackson Gregory and wife Susannah McAfee (his daughter) a bridge known as the McAfee bridge and its operation. Robert McAfee had petitioned the GA legislature to build a wooden covered toll bridge across the Chattahoochee River. He owned property on both sides of the Chattahoochee River. Robert McAfee built a two story dwelling at the bridge where his only daughter and her husband lived for some time and they ran the operation of the toll bridge. The church which Gregory served was not far from the Chattahoochee River area and the McAfee Bridge. The bridge was burned in the Civil War by General Garrard’s troops.  The bridge which was rebuilt and is today known as the Holcomb Bridge and carries a high volume of daily Atlanta traffic. [source]

Here is a newspaper ad when Robert was selling his estate in Rutherford County so that he could move to Georgia:

“Look at this and make up your minds quickly. The subscriber having purchased land in the State of Georgia, and being determined to remove in December next, offers for sale or lease, on accommodating terms, his Plantation, containing 1000 acres of good land; about 200 acres are cleared, and in good farming condition; of which, 93 are bottom, not inferior to any in the State. On the premises is, an excellent two story brick dwelling House, a Mill, an extensive Apple Orchard of select fruit, and other conveniences for the accommodation of the purchaser; situated on Main Broad River, five miles South of Rutherfordton. Also, his house and lot, in Town and a Farm adjacent to it, containing 200 acres, or more; about 30 of which is under cultivation, and is very productive, strong upland. Persons who are desirous of buying, by making application, may obtain good bargains. ROBERT McAFEE, Rutherfordton, Oct. 15, 1831.” [North Carolina Spectator and Western Advertiser (1830-1835), Rutherford Co., NC Abstracts”, 1982, by Helen Mason LU and Gwen NEWMAN. (p. 82)]

He was elected to serve in the North Carolina House of Representatives in 1831. He served one term before moving to GA.  The McAfee family had their hands in the gold mining industry in Rutherford County, NC and this was a factor in their move to GA. You might recall my previous blog post about the Hamilton family and their gold mining interest and eventual move to GA.

The McAfees’ and Hamiltons’ held investments in gold mining within the same Dahlonega, GA area, and John Miller McAfee, M.D., who came from Rutherford, NC to the Dahlonega area, weighed the gold for the Bank at Dahlonega in addition to his medical practice and legislative endeavors. [source]

Please leave a comment below if you have additional information about Robert McAfee that you would like to share.

About the Logan Project: I possess a box of 170 documents passed down 6 generations in the Logan family that originate from John Logan (1775-1841) of Rutherford County, NC. These documents are mainly receipts that show the various business and legal dealings of many different families from Rutherford County, NC. I will be posting these documents on this blog in chronological order. The scanned images of these documents are the copyright of Jonathan Medford. Do not redistribute these documents for the purpose of commercial gain without his expressed written permission.

Previous Post: Jail Tax Receipt January 27, 1822
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John Logan 1823 Tax Receipt

 Jail Tax Receipt dated January 27, 1822

Jail Tax Receipt dated January 27, 1822

Amount of Building tax $433.  27 Jan 1822

Here is a short little receipt that is clearly labeled on the back: “Jail Tax”. In 1822, John Logan was serving as Treasurer of Public Buildings in Rutherford County, NC (I learn this from the receipt I will be featuring next). Therefore, John Logan isn’t likely paying $433.27 for the Jail personally, this is money that he probably collected or managed on behalf of the County.  George Walton held this same position in 1813 as mentioned in a previous post.

This position seems to be a popular county government seat held mostly in the South during the 1800s.

While researching John Logan’s role as Treasurer of Public Buildings, I learned of an article from the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume XXIV (1998), titled ” Petition of John Logan 1827″. Does anyone have access to this article that can share it?

If you have any additional info or insights about the role of the Treasurer of Public Buildings and other men in Rutherford County that held that position, please post a comment below.

About the Logan Project: I possess a box of 170 documents passed down 6 generations in the Logan family that originate from John Logan (1775-1841) of Rutherford County, NC. These documents are mainly receipts that show the various business and legal dealings of many different families from Rutherford County, NC. I will be posting these documents on this blog in chronological order. The scanned images of these documents are the copyright of Jonathan Medford. Do not redistribute these documents for the purpose of commercial gain without his expressed written permission.

Previous Post: James Humphreys receipt October 19, 1821
Next Post:
Robert McAfee Receipt for putting steps to the Court House December 14, 1822

James Humphrey's receipt October 19, 1821

James Humphrey's receipt October 19, 1821

Oct 19th 1821

Recd of W. [Pickins?] one note on Jonah Jones for collection of Ten dollars $10

Jas Humphreys Const.

The most unusual thing to me about this receipt is that it has nothing to do with John Logan. There must be some kind of connection there, I just don’t know what it is. Why would he have this receipt? Apparently [W. Pickins?] had a note against Jonah Jones and he sold it to James Humphries or gave it to him as a form of payment. Perhaps John Logan then purchased this from James Humphreys.

James Humphries
I wasn’t able to find a lot of information on the origins of James Humphries but luckily a Humphries researcher named Casey Humphries gave us a little insight on James in a comment below. Most Humphries in the Rutherford/Cleveland County area are descendants of William Humphries I. This James (b.1796) was most likely the son of John Humphries, William Jr.’s oldest brother (source: Casey Humphries) James was the bondsman for the marriage of William II’s son David Humphries, which typically was done by a relative. Then again he was also the bondsman to the marriage of John Logan and Martha “Patsey” Harton.

James entered land on the east side of Cove Creek, Rutherford Co. in 1818. This is the western part of Rutherford County which is 50 or 60 miles from where most of William I’s family lived. James was always listed in the census as living around Robert Humphries and later Phillip Humphries [source].

Jonah Jones
As someone who has researched Jonas Medford for many years, I know that you need to search both Jonas and Jonah as they were used almost interchangeably. There is a Jonas B. Jones in Rutherford County who married Elizabeth Melton on October 8, 1834. Elizabeth was daughter of Daniel Farrar Melton and Elizabeth Norvell [source].  From the Rutherford County, N. C., Record of Estates, Re-B, page 54, there is a sale bill of Absalom Hunt deceased, 24 February 1841, which listed Jonas B. Jones, J. H. Jones, Alfred Jones and many others.

[W. Pickins?]
I would very much appreciate anyone who could help me decipher this last name! I think it might be Pickens but there just aren’t many (if any) Pickens in Rutherford County, NC during this time period.  Thanks!

This Year in History 1821

  • The U.S. purchased Florida from Spain
  • Missouri is admitted as the 24th U.S. state.
  • Mexico gains its independence from Spain
  • The Santa Fe trail is used by the first White American
  • Napoleon Bonaparte died
  • High quality cotton is introduced in Egypt
  • James Monro is sworn is for his second term as President

If you have any info about James Humphries, Jonah Jones, or can help identitfy the mystery name [W. Pickins?], please post a comment below.

About the Logan Project: I possess a box of 170 documents passed down 6 generations in the Logan family that originate from John Logan (1775-1841) of Rutherford County, NC. These documents are mainly receipts that show the various business and legal dealings of many different families from Rutherford County, NC. I will be posting these documents on this blog in chronological order. The scanned images of these documents are the copyright of Jonathan Medford. Do not redistribute these documents for the purpose of commercial gain without his expressed written permission.

Previous Post: Joseph Bowen receipt for execution against Henry Calihan October 22, 1820
Next Post:
Jail Tax Receipt January 27, 1822

Joseph Bowen receipt for execution against Henry Calihan October 22, 1820

Joseph Bowen receipt for execution against Henry Calihan October 22, 1820

Recd of John Logan eighteen Dollars on an execution against Henry Calihan bought by me of F.F. Alley this 22nd day of October 1820

Jo Bowen

These receipts are sometimes difficult to discern their purpose. Part of the reason why I am working through these documents publicly on this blog is so that I can collaborate with other researchers out there. So please feel free to offer me your interpretation in a comment below.

I think that there must have been a court case of Frederick F. Alley vs. Henry Calihan where Frederick won a judgment against Henry Calihan. Now let’s back track to my previous post about Frederick and recall the following paragraph:

“He was buried in , Fl. He was Sherif of Rutherford Co. January 1814 – Oct 1820. Alley defaulted and his bondsmen, Allen Twitty, Johnson Ledbetter, John H. Alley [his brother], Joseph H. Glover, Abraham Crow, James Crow and John Lewis. They reimbursed the county for losses sustained, but at the sacrifice of their own personal fortunes.” Griffin Pg. 168. SOURCE: Roberta Rose.

This this gets interesting! Frederick was Sheriff of Rutherford County, NC from 1814 until October 1820 when he defaulted. This receipt is dated October 22, 1820. Now either Frederick owed Joseph Bowen money or Frederick was skipping town and liquidating his assets, so he apparently sold his judgment on Henry Calihan to Joseph Bowen. Apparently John Logan helped Joseph recoup money on this judgment.

Henry Callahan was born between 1754 and 1759. He married Elizabeth McMurray. He died in Rutherford County on August 1, 1830. Henry was the son of John Callahan who was born about 1720 (possibly in Ireland), and died about 1766 in Rowan County, North Carolina [source].

Joseph Bowen was a merchant in Rutherfordton, born in 1789. In 1820 her married Mildred C. Twitty, daughter of William and Frances Twitty. She was born in 1799, was about five feet high, with black hair and eyes. They were a member of the Methodist church [source]. Mildred’s brother married John Logan’s first cousin Mary Logan, daughter of his brother Frances Logan.  I’ll let you think about that one for a while. Joseph and Mildred had two children together: Mary Frances Bowen, born in 1822; married Dr. William Anderson, Sr., by whom she had one son (Dr. William Anderson, Jr., who married Georgiana Deal, of Hollidaysburg, Pa). Their son was Thomas Joseph Bowen who was born on August 2, 1824. HE was living with his mother and step-father (John Wilkins) in 1860 in Rutherford County. In 1870 he was living with his sister Mary F. Anderson. He died on September 10, 1879 and was buried in Twitty/Miller, Mountain Creek, Rutherford Co., North Carolina.

Here is Joseph Bowen’s Will (written 24 Sep 1825 and recorded Oct 1825):

In the name of God Amen. I Joseph Bowen of Rutherford county and state of North Carolina, calling to mind the uncertainly of life and the certanty of death, do make and declare this my last will and testament in maner and form following.

First – I give and devise all the lands I received by my beloved wife, Milley, to her in fee simple.

Second – I give and bequeath to my beloved wife the negro girl Mary, which she had at our marriage to have and to hold the said girl, Mary as her own separate and absolute property forever.

Third – I give and bequeath to my beloved wife, Milley, and our two children Mary Ann and Thomas, any increase or children which the said negro girl Mary may have. To have and to hold the said increase as tenant in common, and to be equally divided between them upon either the arrival of our oldest child at twenty one years, the marriage of my daughter or wife.

Fourth – I give and bequeath all the personal property of every description including three hundred dollars and interest on that sum from the first day of May 1823, which I received upon the marriage of my wife, to be her absolute property forever.

Fifth – I will and direct that all my interest in Land and lots, not before mentioned and belonging to the firm of Reinhardt, Bowen and Co., be sold in twelve months on a credit of not less than one year and not more than five years; and all property not received by my wife belongs to the firm and further all debts and credits ____ing the same are due to, or owing from the firm, whether in my individual name or under the signature of the Firm.

Sixth – I give and bequeath all my plans, hand saw and iron square to my brother in law Robert G. Twitty.

Seventh – I desire all the goods in the store to be sold in twelve months on such terms as my representation and the rest of the firm may think best.

Eighth – I desire that all my other property not before mentioned be sold.

Ninth – I wish all my part of the proceeds of the sales of goods in the store and debts due the firm together with all other monies accruing from the sale of my property after payment of Debts, to be equally divided amongst my beloved wife, Milley and our two little children, Mary Ann and Thomas.

And finally – I appoint my trusty friend Robert G. Twitty to be the Executor of this my last will and testament. In witness whereof I have affixed my seal and set my hand the 24th day of September 1825. In presence of Jacob Michal Jos. Bowen O___? B. Irvine [source]

Joseph must have known his time was coming soon because he died on October 1, 1825, just 8 days after writing his will. He was buried in Twitty/Miller, Mountain Creek, Rutherford Co., North Carolina.

If you have any info about Joseph Bowen, Henry Callahan, or Frederick Alley, please post a comment below.

About the Logan Project: I possess a box of 170 documents passed down 6 generations in the Logan family that originate from John Logan (1775-1841) of Rutherford County, NC. These documents are mainly receipts that show the various business and legal dealings of many different families from Rutherford County, NC. I will be posting these documents on this blog in chronological order. The scanned images of these documents are the copyright of Jonathan Medford. Do not redistribute these documents for the purpose of commercial gain without his expressed written permission.

Previous Post: Adam Whiteside receipt for horse and slave December 21, 1818
Next Post:
James Humphreys receipt October 19, 1821

John Alley Receipt December 21, 1818

John Alley Receipt December 21, 1818

Recd of John Logan the Sum of thirty Eight pound of the amount of the sale of a horse & nigger the property of Adam Whiteside Sold at the Instant of Campbell & Bedford this 21st Day December 1818

J.H. Alley DS

Every time I read this receipt, it gives me a big dose of the reality of the times in the early 1800s. John Logan was purchasing a horse and a slave from Adam Whiteside. Campbell & Bedford must have been acting as agents for the transaction, so perhaps Adam had moved away.

When I first read this, I thought that Bedford was Medford which excited me at the time because the only Medfords this could have been would be Jonas Medford or my ancestor Israel Medford (who lived in Morganton at the time). The more I looked at it the more the M looked like a B and Bedfords were common in Rutherford County at the time.

Adam W. Whiteside was the son of William Whiteside (born abt. 1699-Armagh,North Irland–died oct, 1777 Rutherford Co. NC)  and Elizabeth Stockton (born abt. 1724 died abt. 1795 in Rutherford Co. NC).  Karen Hand posted info on the Whiteside Genforum that she received from a Dr. Don Whiteside.  She says that Adam was born about 1755 in Mechum’s Creek Albemarle Co. VA  and died between 1820 & 1830 in Duck River,  Maury Co., Tenn. He served as a Capt. in Col. Andrew Hampton‘s Regiment of NC Militia in the Rev. War. Also served as a Justice of the Peace. Married 1) Unknown 2) 1816 Elizabeth (nee?) Spruell in Maury Co. Tenn.

Although Adam lived in NC for most of his life he was in St. Clair Co. Il in June of 1796, when he and a number of kin were involved in a riot. In 1809, he was in Monroe Co Ill and left “his two children” with his brother, William (1747 – 1815). In 1817, the two children, names not listed, were still living with William’s widow and family as Adam had failed to return to IL. In 1817, Adam was said to be living at Duck River, TN.

This would validate my assumption that Adam moved away from Rutherford County, NC and had Campbell and Bedford act as agents to liquidate his property.

Adam’s children were Male “Samuel”? Whiteside (b@1790 NC – ? CA) and Female? Whiteside (b@1792 d ? IL?).

Further information from Dr. Whiteside posted by Karen Hand states that Male (Samuel) Whiteside b @1790, Orange or Rutherford Co NC, d CA. Miner. Although the name of this child is not known there is evidence which suggests that it could be Samuel. This evidence is found in the California State Historical Society Quarterly, Volume 8, p 72 and Volume 3, p 149, which refers to Samuel Whiteside as a brother to Ninian E. Whiteside (1812 – 1876 CA) who did not have a brother by this name. It is probably that Samuel is the same person who discovered gold in 1852, on Gold Ridge, later named Comptonville (see A History of Comptonville, 1966 p 41) It is not known if Samuel married or had children.

I have written about John H. Alley in two other blog post found here.

I have no idea who Bedford and Campbell might be. There might be other instances where they served in a similar capacity which would help us pinpoint who they might be. I will contact some Bedford and Campbell researchers and see what I can find.

If you have any info about Adam Whiteside, John H. Alley, Campbell or Bedford, please post a comment below.

About the Logan Project: I possess a box of 170 documents passed down 6 generations in the Logan family that originate from John Logan (1775-1841) of Rutherford County, NC. These documents are mainly receipts that show the various business and legal dealings of many different families from Rutherford County, NC. I will be posting these documents on this blog in chronological order. The scanned images of these documents are the copyright of Jonathan Medford. Do not redistribute these documents for the purpose of commercial gain without his expressed written permission.

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Joseph Bowen receipt for execution against Henry Calihan October 22, 1820

Jonathan Medford

Jonathan Medford is an experienced genealogist who specializes in researching North Carolina records. Contact him at jon@medfordgenetics.com.

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